Why Twitter is great for branding

Consumers make their own brands Matt at Kurb thinks Twitter’s not good for branding, because it only allows 140 characters. I disagree.

Branding has always been about a simple, big idea. Just Do It. I’m Loving It. etc.

What’s changing now is that audiences are getting more involved, expressing their own perceptions of brands.

In one way, it’s nothing new. My version of Nike has always been idiosyncratic and different to your perception.

But now we have the tools to mash up our favourite (or least favourite) brands and express our own perception.

If you have a brand, you’d be smart to get into that conversation with others about your brand. You may find hidden facets, things people think about you that you never thought of.

Because it’s a conversation, Twitter gives you the opportunity to practice your brand, and co-create it with your customers and prospects.

Where’s the money? There’s not a straight-line path between exploring your brand on Twitter, and money in the bank. But the line is there. It’s called strategy, and it’s preparing you for next month, next year, two years from now.

And, as my recent post shows , brands don’t need to be commercial. Simple, big ideas can like Twestival and Blackout can cause social change, whether it’s digging wells or changing laws.

And it all comes down to the new world of branding that’s being created on Twitter and other conversation platforms. Are you there? Are you learning?

6 thoughts on “Why Twitter is great for branding

  • Matt @ Kurb

    Stoked to have provoked some discussion on this!

    Though I will say my thoughts were more directed at musicians establishing their brands on twitter.

    It’s like maintaining and developing an established brand in SM – like Nike – is a bit different from establishing a new brand in this space, myspace is my example here which became incredibly sticky for emergent Gen Y trends and brands, because it gave them an easily brandable platform and access to an audience.

    I have my own thoughts obviously, but as I said to @bwagy and on my post, you guys really do represent yourselves well in terms of conversation and SM based brand building and a lot of active users on that site could reflect on the way you guys use it.

    Reply
    • Simon

      Thanks Matt, good clarification about the difference between an established brand vs a new brand. I think the most powerful thing is the combination of Twitter with other social media elements (whether it’s a blog, MySpace site or something else), through which you can create a brand experience.

      But I still reckon if it’s a good brand, you can “get” it in 140 characters. Whether people “get” iJump yet is another question. πŸ™‚ No-one said this stuff was easy. Working on it!

      Reply
  • Simon

    Thanks Matt, good clarification about the difference between an established brand vs a new brand. I think the most powerful thing is the combination of Twitter with other social media elements (whether it’s a blog, MySpace site or something else), through which you can create a brand experience.

    But I still reckon if it’s a good brand, you can “get” it in 140 characters. Whether people “get” iJump yet is another question. πŸ™‚ No-one said this stuff was easy. Working on it!

    Reply
  • Simon

    Thanks Matt, good clarification about the difference between an established brand vs a new brand. I think the most powerful thing is the combination of Twitter with other social media elements (whether it’s a blog, MySpace site or something else), through which you can create a brand experience.

    But I still reckon if it’s a good brand, you can “get” it in 140 characters. Whether people “get” iJump yet is another question. πŸ™‚ No-one said this stuff was easy. Working on it!

    Reply
  • Simon

    Thanks Matt, good clarification about the difference between an established brand vs a new brand. I think the most powerful thing is the combination of Twitter with other social media elements (whether it’s a blog, MySpace site or something else), through which you can create a brand experience.

    But I still reckon if it’s a good brand, you can “get” it in 140 characters. Whether people “get” iJump yet is another question. πŸ™‚ No-one said this stuff was easy. Working on it!

    Reply
  • Simon

    Thanks Matt, good clarification about the difference between an established brand vs a new brand. I think the most powerful thing is the combination of Twitter with other social media elements (whether it’s a blog, MySpace site or something else), through which you can create a brand experience.

    But I still reckon if it’s a good brand, you can “get” it in 140 characters. Whether people “get” iJump yet is another question. πŸ™‚ No-one said this stuff was easy. Working on it!

    Reply

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