Tweeting for a living

Jon Burkhart has one of the best jobs in the world – he gets paid to tweet on behalf of brands.

Sounds like fun, and there’s a good business reason for it to. Check out our iJumpTV interview with Jon, also known as Albinoriotman :

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zclandmsKEU[/youtube]

(Brought to you in glorious high definition thanks to Lewis Bostock )

There’s some great stuff on iJumpTV (if we do say so ourselves), including an interview with someone doing a PhD on corporate blogging , highlights from the Marketing Now conference , and – coming up – social media in action in entertainment, startups and community groups!

It’s best if you subscribe , that way you get each new episode delivered (they come out roughly every week). Not sure how to subscribe? Here’s how .

18 thoughts on “Tweeting for a living

  • Glenn

    Jon brought up authenticity and how he worked out to overcome the sense of dishonesty people might feel about ghost twitterers. He has come up with one answer that is working well.

    My feeling on tweeting for brands is that if there isnt an icon or character you can use, then be open and honest about who is doing the tweeting.

    Because Twitter can help put a face to a brand, why can’t it be someone who is really passionate about the brand, if the company doesnt have the resource / time to do it properly.

    Reply
    • Simon

      Your last point is a really good one, and an idea that courageous brands might take up. There are a lot of combinations of possibilities:

      harnessing a passionate fan, who will represent the brand for free
      paying a fan to tweet for you
      paying a professional to tweet for you
      doing it in-house

      Those are just some of the possibilities, all with pros and cons.

      Reply
  • Glenn

    Jon brought up authenticity and how he worked out to overcome the sense of dishonesty people might feel about ghost twitterers. He has come up with one answer that is working well.

    My feeling on tweeting for brands is that if there isnt an icon or character you can use, then be open and honest about who is doing the tweeting.

    Because Twitter can help put a face to a brand, why can’t it be someone who is really passionate about the brand, if the company doesnt have the resource / time to do it properly.

    Reply
    • Simon

      Your last point is a really good one, and an idea that courageous brands might take up. There are a lot of combinations of possibilities:

      harnessing a passionate fan, who will represent the brand for free
      paying a fan to tweet for you
      paying a professional to tweet for you
      doing it in-house

      Those are just some of the possibilities, all with pros and cons.

      Reply
  • Glenn

    Jon brought up authenticity and how he worked out to overcome the sense of dishonesty people might feel about ghost twitterers. He has come up with one answer that is working well.

    My feeling on tweeting for brands is that if there isnt an icon or character you can use, then be open and honest about who is doing the tweeting.

    Because Twitter can help put a face to a brand, why can’t it be someone who is really passionate about the brand, if the company doesnt have the resource / time to do it properly.

    Reply
    • Simon

      Your last point is a really good one, and an idea that courageous brands might take up. There are a lot of combinations of possibilities:

      harnessing a passionate fan, who will represent the brand for free
      paying a fan to tweet for you
      paying a professional to tweet for you
      doing it in-house

      Those are just some of the possibilities, all with pros and cons.

      Reply
  • Glenn

    Jon brought up authenticity and how he worked out to overcome the sense of dishonesty people might feel about ghost twitterers. He has come up with one answer that is working well.

    My feeling on tweeting for brands is that if there isnt an icon or character you can use, then be open and honest about who is doing the tweeting.

    Because Twitter can help put a face to a brand, why can’t it be someone who is really passionate about the brand, if the company doesnt have the resource / time to do it properly.

    Reply
    • Simon

      Your last point is a really good one, and an idea that courageous brands might take up. There are a lot of combinations of possibilities:

      harnessing a passionate fan, who will represent the brand for free
      paying a fan to tweet for you
      paying a professional to tweet for you
      doing it in-house

      Those are just some of the possibilities, all with pros and cons.

      Reply
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