Jump In #28: Saatchi Strategist Murray Streets, Part 2

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Murray Streets joins us again to discuss some of the most common objections to companies learning about social media, and why the internet is like a party! Don’t forget to subscribe to Jump In and never miss a show!
Formats available : Quicktime (.mov)

4 thoughts on “Jump In #28: Saatchi Strategist Murray Streets, Part 2

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  • Adam Daniel Mezei

    Hi gang,

    Social media should ideally be an internationally-popular medium in which to hold court…

    Trouble I see is that in the English-speaking countries — where the Web 1.0 basically came into its own — there’s a commonly-accepted means of interacting online.

    What bothers me about the convergence of the Bloc and social media is this: if the emerging economies of the former Bloc are *already* leapfrogging over the traditional development curves (eg. uptake of mobile phones before full penetration of landlines is an “old” example), then why can’t they also innovate when it comes to social media?

    Why all of the rancor online at Czech websites or blogs when people don’t agree with one another (it’s on a par with a “national sport,” we say here). Surely, innovating in social media should improve this?

    Loved the “party” example, too. Apt.

    Reply
  • Adam Daniel Mezei

    Hi gang,

    Social media should ideally be an internationally-popular medium in which to hold court…

    Trouble I see is that in the English-speaking countries — where the Web 1.0 basically came into its own — there’s a commonly-accepted means of interacting online.

    What bothers me about the convergence of the Bloc and social media is this: if the emerging economies of the former Bloc are *already* leapfrogging over the traditional development curves (eg. uptake of mobile phones before full penetration of landlines is an “old” example), then why can’t they also innovate when it comes to social media?

    Why all of the rancor online at Czech websites or blogs when people don’t agree with one another (it’s on a par with a “national sport,” we say here). Surely, innovating in social media should improve this?

    Loved the “party” example, too. Apt.

    Reply
  • Adam Daniel Mezei

    Hi gang,

    Social media should ideally be an internationally-popular medium in which to hold court…

    Trouble I see is that in the English-speaking countries — where the Web 1.0 basically came into its own — there’s a commonly-accepted means of interacting online.

    What bothers me about the convergence of the Bloc and social media is this: if the emerging economies of the former Bloc are *already* leapfrogging over the traditional development curves (eg. uptake of mobile phones before full penetration of landlines is an “old” example), then why can’t they also innovate when it comes to social media?

    Why all of the rancor online at Czech websites or blogs when people don’t agree with one another (it’s on a par with a “national sport,” we say here). Surely, innovating in social media should improve this?

    Loved the “party” example, too. Apt.

    Reply

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