Jump In #15: ASB Bank’s iwantahome corporate blog

ASB Bank’s Toby Hilless and Janet Meacher discuss lessons learned from their company blog, iwantahome.co.nz. You’ll hear:

  • Who creates content for a company blog?

  • How to progress from magazine to blog

  • How to manage a constantly evolving publication

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This is really encouraging for large businesses that are sitting on the sidelines – it’s time to jump in. ASB can give you a few tips on how to do that. There’s also details of our competition to win a copy of Joseph Jaffe‘s Join the Conversation – simply send your audio or video comment to simon@ijump.co.nz. Joseph’s a renowned author, blogger and podcaster in the field of new media.Get the latest Jump In for free in iTunes or on the web. Subscribe!

14 thoughts on “Jump In #15: ASB Bank’s iwantahome corporate blog

  • Pingback: iJump.co.nz » Audiopodcast » (Audio) Jump In #15: ASB Bank’s iwantahome corporate blog

  • Tony Eyles

    Thanks guys – it takes a mature brand and marketing function to have the confidence to open conversations this way. The trick is not to be overtly promoting or spinning on your services – else you come across as manipulative and risk it blowing up in your face.

    Reply
  • Tony Eyles

    Thanks guys – it takes a mature brand and marketing function to have the confidence to open conversations this way. The trick is not to be overtly promoting or spinning on your services – else you come across as manipulative and risk it blowing up in your face.

    Reply
  • Gregg Nelson

    Hi Simon and Marie,

    Well done with a great website.

    I certainly am using your resource daily to keep an eye on the New Zealand market.

    Mashable is just so irrelevant to people downunder.

    Keep it up

    Team Oziwi

    Reply
  • Gregg Nelson

    Hi Simon and Marie,

    Well done with a great website.

    I certainly am using your resource daily to keep an eye on the New Zealand market.

    Mashable is just so irrelevant to people downunder.

    Keep it up

    Team Oziwi

    Reply
  • Simon

    Thanks Tony and Gregg for your comments. Tony, I so agree with your comments about not overtly spinning your services. It’s part of a trend in marketing that the academics call service-dominant logic, which you can find out more about at http://simonyoung.co.nz/the-future-of-marketing-on-newsstands-today/

    Of course, there’s also the problem of being so non-self-serving that people don’t actually know what you do.

    Gregg – that’s a great compliment. Thanks! Who do you turn to for info on the Aussie market?

    Reply
  • Simon

    Thanks Tony and Gregg for your comments. Tony, I so agree with your comments about not overtly spinning your services. It’s part of a trend in marketing that the academics call service-dominant logic, which you can find out more about at http://simonyoung.co.nz/the-future-of-marketing-on-newsstands-today/

    Of course, there’s also the problem of being so non-self-serving that people don’t actually know what you do.

    Gregg – that’s a great compliment. Thanks! Who do you turn to for info on the Aussie market?

    Reply
  • Pingback: iJump.co.nz » Audiopodcast » (Audio) Jump in #16 ASB bank’s iwantahome corporate blog part 2

  • Pingback: iJump.co.nz » Video podcast » Jump in #16 ASB bank’s iwantahome corporate blog part 2

  • Tony Eyles

    Thanks for the link Simon – I had missed that article. I totally buy the services argument – it helps marketers focus on the real reasons people buy.

    I think corporate blogging is especially tricky because of this balance you need to find between self-service and reader-service. If you get it right then everyone will understand what you do, and accept why you are blogging because it works for them too. Just another honest exchange. Is that naive?

    Reply
  • Tony Eyles

    Thanks for the link Simon – I had missed that article. I totally buy the services argument – it helps marketers focus on the real reasons people buy.

    I think corporate blogging is especially tricky because of this balance you need to find between self-service and reader-service. If you get it right then everyone will understand what you do, and accept why you are blogging because it works for them too. Just another honest exchange. Is that naive?

    Reply
  • Tony Eyles

    Thanks for the link Simon – I had missed that article. I totally buy the services argument – it helps marketers focus on the real reasons people buy.

    I think corporate blogging is especially tricky because of this balance you need to find between self-service and reader-service. If you get it right then everyone will understand what you do, and accept why you are blogging because it works for them too. Just another honest exchange. Is that naive?

    Reply
  • Simon

    Not naive at all, Tony. It’s just hard to get to “honest exchange” when the culture of business has been steeped in manipulation and getting someone to do something. It’s always a pleasant surprise when someone representing a business can be both human and in business – and that’s what blogging is all about.

    Reply
  • Simon

    Not naive at all, Tony. It’s just hard to get to “honest exchange” when the culture of business has been steeped in manipulation and getting someone to do something. It’s always a pleasant surprise when someone representing a business can be both human and in business – and that’s what blogging is all about.

    Reply

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