Fear of death and social media

A few weeks ago I had my first near-death experience (well, in a long time, anyway). I plunged 80 metres into a canyon, swung perilously close (it felt) to a cliff edge, and nearly froze. (The freezing part wasn’t part of Mokai Gravity Canyon‘s offering, it was just the weather in Taihape!

Here’s my terror for you to enjoy:

Why is it scary to fall 80 metres for some (like me), and not for others (like Marie, who swung and then bungy jumped twice in two days!)?

And why is experimenting with social media terrifying for some executives?

I thought about this a lot after my experience. There is a correlation – fear of death, or a fear of the loss of normal.

As I fell, I was outside my comfort zone (to put it mildly!). Free falling was exhilarating, but I don’t want to make it a way of life.

The same is true of executives today – experimentation on a personal level can be fun, rewarding and interesting, but the uncertainty and lack of “proven models” takes away the illusion of security that traditional marketing and management methods give us.

Yet maybe the most important 21st century management discipline is becoming comfortable with that level of uncertainty, that “free fall”. This is true of all kinds of innovation, not just social media.

But just as I wouldn’t dare dropping even 10 feet without professional help, it’s a really good idea to seek out professional help as you venture into social media – both for their expertise, and their ability to go through the journey with you.

Sometimes people come to us – and to other social media practitioners – expecting a foolproof formula, a standardised system that gets results every time. While that’s a great sales pitch, it doesn’t reflect reality.

Social media is about relationships, and anyone wanting relationships that “get results every time”, isn’t living in the real world.

Better to have a trusted guide than a foolproof system any day.

What’s holding you back? And how could a trusted partner help you get to the next step?A few weeks ago I had my first near-death experience (well, in a long time, anyway). I plunged 80 metres into a canyon, swung perilously close (it felt) to a cliff edge, and nearly froze. (The freezing part wasn’t part of Mokai Gravity Canyon‘s offering, it was just the weather in Taihape!

Here’s my terror for you to enjoy:

Why is it scary to fall 80 metres for some (like me), and not for others (like Marie, who swung and then bungy jumped twice in two days!)?

And why is experimenting with social media terrifying for some executives?

I thought about this a lot after my experience. There is a correlation – fear of death, or a fear of the loss of normal.

As I fell, I was outside my comfort zone (to put it mildly!). Free falling was exhilarating, but I don’t want to make it a way of life.

The same is true of executives today – experimentation on a personal level can be fun, rewarding and interesting, but the uncertainty and lack of “proven models” takes away the illusion of security that traditional marketing and management methods give us.

Yet maybe the most important 21st century management discipline is becoming comfortable with that level of uncertainty, that “free fall”. This is true of all kinds of innovation, not just social media.

But just as I wouldn’t dare dropping even 10 feet without professional help, it’s a really good idea to seek out professional help as you venture into social media – both for their expertise, and their ability to go through the journey with you.

Sometimes people come to us – and to other social media practitioners – expecting a foolproof formula, a standardised system that gets results every time. While that’s a great sales pitch, it doesn’t reflect reality.

Social media is about relationships, and anyone wanting relationships that “get results every time”, isn’t living in the real world.

Better to have a trusted guide than a foolproof system any day.

What’s holding you back? And how could a trusted partner help you get to the next step?

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