Are you preparing your clients and customers for conversational marketing?

Amongst all the noise, information overload and the ever- evolving new media, our clients and customers are our highest priority. But are they?

We can get so busy that we forget who’s really important.

Combining traditional media and the right social media tools for your brand will help you begin a journey towards a conversation with your valuable audience.

It’s a bit like applying make – up (sorry guys). As women we know that lipstick alone isn’t enough to enhance natural beauty. But a combination of the right tools – like the right concealer, foundation , blusher, mascara, eye liner (I think you know where I’m going) – can make a significant change to a woman’s appearance, let alone her self esteem.

By combining your current traditional media methods – whether it’s a monthly newsletter, ad in the paper, radio ad – and choosing the right social media tools, you can start to look good for your audience and create a space to share and create experiences with the people that matter most.

Last Friday Simon and I decided to grab a bite out and catch a movie. We went to the Village SkyCity Metro in Auckland. We asked the girl behind the counter to divide a large popcorn into two smaller boxes. It wasn’t just difficult – it was impossible.

Most consumers have a personal blog and when they’re not happy about service they’ll tell the world.

Wouldn’t it be nice if you’re there, ready to start a conversation when it happens.

If you haven’t noticed, I’m a client / customer advocate, totally mad about positive brand experience. Bad customer experience isn’t the end, but it’s an opportunity to fix the problem.

Companies such as Red Bull and Zara deliver their CVP through great experiences, listen to the stories people tell about them and then ‘amplify’ them back in their own communications: saves an enormous amount on advertising creative costs.

“Customers who contribute product reviews or post messages visit community sites nine times more often than sites without communities, remain twice as loyal and buy almost twice as often, even customers who just read community interaction are more frequent visitors and buyers.” 2001 McKinsey Report

Read more Is there value in socialising with customers? – 03 Apr 2008

Photo courtesy of DeaPeaJay




 

6 thoughts on “Are you preparing your clients and customers for conversational marketing?

  • Jenny

    The aspect of control of messages seems to be a common theme amongst brand owners. As an SME owner with contractors who entertain our clients guests and are a company with very limited resources. We do all to ensure client satisfaction, but a blog could be SME suicide for the very very few occasions when client expectations differ from what we can/have delivered. Maybe the topic of control/damage control could be addressed in an article you write?

    Reply
  • Jenny

    The aspect of control of messages seems to be a common theme amongst brand owners. As an SME owner with contractors who entertain our clients guests and are a company with very limited resources. We do all to ensure client satisfaction, but a blog could be SME suicide for the very very few occasions when client expectations differ from what we can/have delivered. Maybe the topic of control/damage control could be addressed in an article you write?

    Reply
  • Jenny

    The aspect of control of messages seems to be a common theme amongst brand owners. As an SME owner with contractors who entertain our clients guests and are a company with very limited resources. We do all to ensure client satisfaction, but a blog could be SME suicide for the very very few occasions when client expectations differ from what we can/have delivered. Maybe the topic of control/damage control could be addressed in an article you write?

    Reply
  • Simon

    That’s a great suggestion, Jenny. Thanks!

    You raise a really good point – what about companies that have limited resources and work with contractors, where there’s limited control over their standards.

    However, it doesn’t really make any difference whether you have a blog or not if a customer has a bad experience. They have plenty of platforms to make their feelings known. If you have a blog, then, you’ll be able to participate in the conversation more easily.

    Better still, focus on making your experiences so remarkable that you actually get a lot of positive word of mouth.

    Reply
  • Simon

    That’s a great suggestion, Jenny. Thanks!

    You raise a really good point – what about companies that have limited resources and work with contractors, where there’s limited control over their standards.

    However, it doesn’t really make any difference whether you have a blog or not if a customer has a bad experience. They have plenty of platforms to make their feelings known. If you have a blog, then, you’ll be able to participate in the conversation more easily.

    Better still, focus on making your experiences so remarkable that you actually get a lot of positive word of mouth.

    Reply
  • Simon

    That’s a great suggestion, Jenny. Thanks!

    You raise a really good point – what about companies that have limited resources and work with contractors, where there’s limited control over their standards.

    However, it doesn’t really make any difference whether you have a blog or not if a customer has a bad experience. They have plenty of platforms to make their feelings known. If you have a blog, then, you’ll be able to participate in the conversation more easily.

    Better still, focus on making your experiences so remarkable that you actually get a lot of positive word of mouth.

    Reply

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